Martin Brodeur

Martin Brodeur is a former ice hockey player born on May 6, 1972. He has enjoyed one of the best careers in the NHL, recording 691 victories. Brodeur is regarded as the best goalie of all time. Although the debate about who is the best goalie may go on forever, his impressive records and awards cement him among the top players in NHL history.

Early Life

Martin Brodeur was born in Montreal to Dennis and Mireille Brodeur. Martin loved hockey from an early age because his father had played for Team Canada during the 1956 Olympics. He had even won a bronze medal. Dennis later became a photographer for the Montreal Canadiens. He attended all the club games, including the practice, for over 20 years. When Martin was old enough, he tagged along and developed an interest in the sport. Patrick Roy, Canadiens’ goaltender, was his idol.

At the age of 12, Bordeur nearly stopped playing hockey after being removed from the lineup for failing to show up at a game. As a teen, he learned various methods of goaltending and even attended Vladislav Tretiak training camp.

NHL Career

Brodeur began his career playing for Saint-Hyacinthe between 1989 to 1992. His breakthrough came when he was called on an emergency basis. The New Jersey goalies Craig Bilington and Chris Terreri were injured, and the position needed urgent replacement. He won his NHL debut 4-2 against Boston Bruins. In the following season, he played for the Utica Devils of AHL.

In the 1993-94 season, Brodeur returned to NHL permanently, where he received the Calder Memorial Trophy for the best rookie. He had recorded a 2.40 for the season against average and 1.95 in the 17 playoff games. During the 48-game season in 1994-95, Brodeur led his team to win the Stanley Cup championship. During this season, he recorded 19 wins, 11 losses, and 6 ties. He even became the second goaltender to score a goal during a playoff match.

Brodeur participated in the Olympic games of 2010, 2006, 2002,1998 as a member of Team Canada. By the 2013-14 season, Brodeur took the position of the backup goaltender for the Devils. He had his final NHL win 3-0 against Avalanche in December 2014. Subsequently, his contract expired, and Brodeur signed a one-year deal with St. Louis Blues. He only appeared in six games before retiring permanently in 2015.

Upon Brodeur retirement, the blues hired him as an assistant general manager to Doug Armstrong on May 22, 2015. He later became the Devils executive vice president dealing with business development on August 29, 2018.

Achievements and Awards

Brodeur has broken many records and received numerous awards throughout his career. He holds the record for the league’s most outstanding goaltender for four seasons. Besides, he also has a record of a 40-win season and a consecutive 30-win season.

In March 2009, Brodeur broke Patrick Roy’s record to become the all-time winningest league goalie. He also played his 1,030 season game in December 2009, breaking a record for a goaltender. In the same year, Brodeur set a new record of 104 shutouts. Furthermore, he is the first goalie ever to have three shutouts in two different playoff series.

When it comes to awards and trophies, Brodeur is unbeatable. Here is a glimpse of some of the recognition that he earned over his career years.

  • William M. Jennings Trophy of 1997, 1998, 2003,2004, and 2010
  • Vezina Trophy – 2003, 2004, 2007, and 2008
  • Stanley Cup- 1995, 2000,2003
  • World Cup of Hockey Championship of 2004
  • Olympic Gold Medal of 2002 and 2010

Bottom Line

Martin Brodeur is no doubt the best goaltender in the history of NHL. He has played 1,266 games, recorded 691 wins, 397 losses, 105 ties, and a GAA of 2.24. His career success is an inspiring story of what determination can achieve. In 2017, he was named among the “100 Greatest NHL Players” and joined the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2018.

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